Jin H. Wen

PhD. Student in Health Psychology
location_on Kenny Room 1007--2136 West Mall
file_download Download CV

Research Area

Education

M.A. in Health Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2020
B.A. in Psychology, Chapman University, 2015

About

Jin completed his Master’s degree in Health Psychology at the University of British Columbia in 2020. He is currently a PhD student in the Health Psychology program under the supervision of Dr. Nancy Sin. Jin’s research interest is examining the effects of night-to-night sleep on daily stress and emotions via ecological momentary assessments and biomarkers (e.g., cortisol, inflammation). His current research seeks to evaluate cognitive appraisals as potential mechanisms in the links between objective sleep measures (e.g. actigraphy) and next-day affective reactivity to daily stressors. His future goal is to strive to develop accessible interventions to help improve sleep hygiene as well as mitigate the negative effects of daily stress.


Research

Sleep, stress buffering/resilience factors, daily experiences, psychophysiology, emotion regulation, aberrant cognitions and behaviors.


Publications

Wen, J.H., Klaiber, P., DeLongis, A., Slavish, D., & Sin, N.L. (2021). Day-to-day associations between nightly sleep and next-day well-being amid the COVID-19 pandemic in North America. Sleep Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2021.09.007.  [preregistration]

Wen, J.H., & Sin, N.L. (2021). Perceived control and cortisol reactivity to acute stressors: Variations by age, race, and facets of control. Stress and Health. https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.3103.

Klaiber, P., Wen, J.H., Ong, A.D., & Sin, N. L. (2021).Personality differences in the occurrence and affective correlates of daily positive events. Journal of Personality. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12676. [Data | Code]

Ying, F*., Wen, J.H., Klaiber, P., DeLongis, A., Slavish, D.C., & Sin, N.L., (2021). Associations between intraindividual variability in sleep and daily positive affect. Affective Science. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42761-021-00082-6.

Sin, N. L., Klaiber, P., Wen, J. H., & DeLongis, A. (2020). Helping amid the pandemic: Daily affective and social implications of COVID-19-related prosocial activities. The Gerontologist. https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnaa140.

Sin, N. L., Wen, J. H., Klaiber, P., Buxton, O. M., & Almeida, D. M. (2020). Sleep duration and affective reactivity to stressors and positive events in daily life. Health Psychology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0001033

Klaiber, P., Wen, J.H., DeLongis, A., & Sin, N.L., (2020) The ups and downs of daily life during COVID-19: Age differences in affect, stress, and positive events. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa096.

Wen, J. H., Lyubomirsky, S., & Sin, N. L. (2020). Positive activity interventions targeted to improve depressive symptoms. In Donaldson, S. I., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Nakamura, J. (Eds.), Applied positive psychology: Improving everyday life, schools, work, health, and society (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

*asterick denotes undergraduate advisee


Awards

Killam Doctoral Scholarship – University of British Columbia, 2021

Certificate of Academic Excellence for Best Master’s Thesis – Canadian Psychological Association, 2021

Behavioral and Social Sciences Student Research Award (Pre-Dissertation Level)  – Gerontological Society of America, 2020

 


Jin H. Wen

PhD. Student in Health Psychology
location_on Kenny Room 1007--2136 West Mall
file_download Download CV

M.A. in Health Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2020
B.A. in Psychology, Chapman University, 2015

Jin completed his Master's degree in Health Psychology at the University of British Columbia in 2020. He is currently a PhD student in the Health Psychology program under the supervision of Dr. Nancy Sin. Jin's research interest is examining the effects of night-to-night sleep on daily stress and emotions via ecological momentary assessments and biomarkers (e.g., cortisol, inflammation). His current research seeks to evaluate cognitive appraisals as potential mechanisms in the links between objective sleep measures (e.g. actigraphy) and next-day affective reactivity to daily stressors. His future goal is to strive to develop accessible interventions to help improve sleep hygiene as well as mitigate the negative effects of daily stress.

Sleep, stress buffering/resilience factors, daily experiences, psychophysiology, emotion regulation, aberrant cognitions and behaviors.

Wen, J.H., Klaiber, P., DeLongis, A., Slavish, D., & Sin, N.L. (2021). Day-to-day associations between nightly sleep and next-day well-being amid the COVID-19 pandemic in North America. Sleep Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2021.09.007.  [preregistration]

Wen, J.H., & Sin, N.L. (2021). Perceived control and cortisol reactivity to acute stressors: Variations by age, race, and facets of control. Stress and Health. https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.3103.

Klaiber, P., Wen, J.H., Ong, A.D., & Sin, N. L. (2021).Personality differences in the occurrence and affective correlates of daily positive events. Journal of Personality. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12676. [Data | Code]

Ying, F*., Wen, J.H., Klaiber, P., DeLongis, A., Slavish, D.C., & Sin, N.L., (2021). Associations between intraindividual variability in sleep and daily positive affect. Affective Science. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42761-021-00082-6.

Sin, N. L., Klaiber, P., Wen, J. H., & DeLongis, A. (2020). Helping amid the pandemic: Daily affective and social implications of COVID-19-related prosocial activities. The Gerontologist. https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnaa140.

Sin, N. L., Wen, J. H., Klaiber, P., Buxton, O. M., & Almeida, D. M. (2020). Sleep duration and affective reactivity to stressors and positive events in daily life. Health Psychology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0001033

Klaiber, P., Wen, J.H., DeLongis, A., & Sin, N.L., (2020) The ups and downs of daily life during COVID-19: Age differences in affect, stress, and positive events. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa096.

Wen, J. H., Lyubomirsky, S., & Sin, N. L. (2020). Positive activity interventions targeted to improve depressive symptoms. In Donaldson, S. I., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Nakamura, J. (Eds.), Applied positive psychology: Improving everyday life, schools, work, health, and society (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

*asterick denotes undergraduate advisee

Killam Doctoral Scholarship – University of British Columbia, 2021

Certificate of Academic Excellence for Best Master’s Thesis – Canadian Psychological Association, 2021

Behavioral and Social Sciences Student Research Award (Pre-Dissertation Level)  – Gerontological Society of America, 2020

 

Jin H. Wen

PhD. Student in Health Psychology
location_on Kenny Room 1007--2136 West Mall
file_download Download CV

M.A. in Health Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2020
B.A. in Psychology, Chapman University, 2015

Jin completed his Master's degree in Health Psychology at the University of British Columbia in 2020. He is currently a PhD student in the Health Psychology program under the supervision of Dr. Nancy Sin. Jin's research interest is examining the effects of night-to-night sleep on daily stress and emotions via ecological momentary assessments and biomarkers (e.g., cortisol, inflammation). His current research seeks to evaluate cognitive appraisals as potential mechanisms in the links between objective sleep measures (e.g. actigraphy) and next-day affective reactivity to daily stressors. His future goal is to strive to develop accessible interventions to help improve sleep hygiene as well as mitigate the negative effects of daily stress.

Sleep, stress buffering/resilience factors, daily experiences, psychophysiology, emotion regulation, aberrant cognitions and behaviors.

Wen, J.H., Klaiber, P., DeLongis, A., Slavish, D., & Sin, N.L. (2021). Day-to-day associations between nightly sleep and next-day well-being amid the COVID-19 pandemic in North America. Sleep Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2021.09.007.  [preregistration]

Wen, J.H., & Sin, N.L. (2021). Perceived control and cortisol reactivity to acute stressors: Variations by age, race, and facets of control. Stress and Health. https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.3103.

Klaiber, P., Wen, J.H., Ong, A.D., & Sin, N. L. (2021).Personality differences in the occurrence and affective correlates of daily positive events. Journal of Personality. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12676. [Data | Code]

Ying, F*., Wen, J.H., Klaiber, P., DeLongis, A., Slavish, D.C., & Sin, N.L., (2021). Associations between intraindividual variability in sleep and daily positive affect. Affective Science. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42761-021-00082-6.

Sin, N. L., Klaiber, P., Wen, J. H., & DeLongis, A. (2020). Helping amid the pandemic: Daily affective and social implications of COVID-19-related prosocial activities. The Gerontologist. https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnaa140.

Sin, N. L., Wen, J. H., Klaiber, P., Buxton, O. M., & Almeida, D. M. (2020). Sleep duration and affective reactivity to stressors and positive events in daily life. Health Psychology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0001033

Klaiber, P., Wen, J.H., DeLongis, A., & Sin, N.L., (2020) The ups and downs of daily life during COVID-19: Age differences in affect, stress, and positive events. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa096.

Wen, J. H., Lyubomirsky, S., & Sin, N. L. (2020). Positive activity interventions targeted to improve depressive symptoms. In Donaldson, S. I., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Nakamura, J. (Eds.), Applied positive psychology: Improving everyday life, schools, work, health, and society (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

*asterick denotes undergraduate advisee

Killam Doctoral Scholarship – University of British Columbia, 2021

Certificate of Academic Excellence for Best Master’s Thesis – Canadian Psychological Association, 2021

Behavioral and Social Sciences Student Research Award (Pre-Dissertation Level)  – Gerontological Society of America, 2020