Elizabeth Dunn

Professor
phone 604 827 3144
location_on Kenny Room 2013--2136 West Mall

Research Areas

Education

PhD, University of Virginia, 2004

About

Dr. Elizabeth Dunn is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia. Dunn conducts experimental research examining how time, money, and technology shape human happiness. She is the co-author of Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending (Simon & Schuster) with Dr. Michael Norton and she has given talks at PopTech! and TEDx.


Research

Dr. Dunn conducts experimental research on happiness, with a current focus on how mobile technology can both support and undermine human well-being. Her work has appeared in top journals, with three papers published in Science.


Publications

Dwyer, R., Kushlev, K. & Dunn, E. W. (2018). Smartphone use undermines the enjoyment of face-to-face interactions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 78: 233-239. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2017.10.007.

Dunn, E. W. & Dwyer, R. (2018). Technology and the Future of Happiness. In Forgas, J. P. & Baumeister, R. F. (Eds.), The Social Psychology of Living Well. New York: Psychology Press.

Whillans, A. V., Dunn, E. W. & Norton, M. I. (2018). Overcoming barriers to time-saving: Reminders of future busyness encourage consumers to buy time. Social Influence, 13,117-124.

Dwyer, R., Dunn, E. W. & Hershfield, H. (2017). Cousins or conjoined twins: How different are meaning and happiness in everyday life?. Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, doi: 10.1080/23743603.2017.1376580.

Kushlev, K., Proulx, J. D. E. & Dunn, E. W. (2017). Digitally connected, socially disconnected: The effects of relying on technology rather than other people. Computers in Human Behaviour, 76: 68-74.

Whillans, A. V., Dunn, E. W., Smeets, P., Bekkers, R. & Norton, M. I. (2017). Buying time promotes happiness. PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1706541114.

Dunn, E. W., & Norton, M. (2013). Happy Money: The science of smarter spending. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Nelson, S. K., Kushlev, K., English, T., Carstensen, L. L., Dunn, E. W. & Lyubomirsky, S. (2013). In defence of parenthood: Children are associated with more joy that misery. Psychological Science, 24(1): 3-10.

Quoidbach, J., Dunn, E. W., Petrides, K. V., & Mikolajczak, M. (2010). Money giveth, money taketh away: The dual effect of wealth on happiness. Psychological Science, 21: 759-763.

Kawakami, K., Dunn, E. W., Karmali, F. & Dovidio, J. F. (2009). Mispredicting affective and behavioural responses to racism. Science, 323: 276-278.

Dunn, E. W., Aknin, L. B., & Norton, M. I. (2008). Spending money on others promotes happiness. Science, 319: 1687-1688.

For a list of full publication, visit Google Scholar or her lab website.


Awards

  • Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists (2015)
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014 Fellow)
  • Social Science and Humanities Research Council Impact Connection Award Finalist (2014 and 2015)
  • Killam Faculty Research Fellowship (2011)
  • Killam Faculty Research Prize (2010)
  • Robert E. Knox Master Teaching Award (2010)
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award (2010)
  • Mind Gym Academic Prize Honouree (2007)
  • Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies – Early Career Scholar (2007)
  • Chronicle of Higher Education Rising Star (2004)

Graduate Supervision

Dr. Dunn is currently accepting graduate students.


Elizabeth Dunn

Professor
phone 604 827 3144
location_on Kenny Room 2013--2136 West Mall

PhD, University of Virginia, 2004

Dr. Elizabeth Dunn is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia. Dunn conducts experimental research examining how time, money, and technology shape human happiness. She is the co-author of Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending (Simon & Schuster) with Dr. Michael Norton and she has given talks at PopTech! and TEDx.

Dr. Dunn conducts experimental research on happiness, with a current focus on how mobile technology can both support and undermine human well-being. Her work has appeared in top journals, with three papers published in Science.

Dwyer, R., Kushlev, K. & Dunn, E. W. (2018). Smartphone use undermines the enjoyment of face-to-face interactions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 78: 233-239. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2017.10.007.

Dunn, E. W. & Dwyer, R. (2018). Technology and the Future of Happiness. In Forgas, J. P. & Baumeister, R. F. (Eds.), The Social Psychology of Living Well. New York: Psychology Press.

Whillans, A. V., Dunn, E. W. & Norton, M. I. (2018). Overcoming barriers to time-saving: Reminders of future busyness encourage consumers to buy time. Social Influence, 13,117-124.

Dwyer, R., Dunn, E. W. & Hershfield, H. (2017). Cousins or conjoined twins: How different are meaning and happiness in everyday life?. Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, doi: 10.1080/23743603.2017.1376580.

Kushlev, K., Proulx, J. D. E. & Dunn, E. W. (2017). Digitally connected, socially disconnected: The effects of relying on technology rather than other people. Computers in Human Behaviour, 76: 68-74.

Whillans, A. V., Dunn, E. W., Smeets, P., Bekkers, R. & Norton, M. I. (2017). Buying time promotes happiness. PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1706541114.

Dunn, E. W., & Norton, M. (2013). Happy Money: The science of smarter spending. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Nelson, S. K., Kushlev, K., English, T., Carstensen, L. L., Dunn, E. W. & Lyubomirsky, S. (2013). In defence of parenthood: Children are associated with more joy that misery. Psychological Science, 24(1): 3-10.

Quoidbach, J., Dunn, E. W., Petrides, K. V., & Mikolajczak, M. (2010). Money giveth, money taketh away: The dual effect of wealth on happiness. Psychological Science, 21: 759-763.

Kawakami, K., Dunn, E. W., Karmali, F. & Dovidio, J. F. (2009). Mispredicting affective and behavioural responses to racism. Science, 323: 276-278.

Dunn, E. W., Aknin, L. B., & Norton, M. I. (2008). Spending money on others promotes happiness. Science, 319: 1687-1688.

For a list of full publication, visit Google Scholar or her lab website.

  • Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists (2015)
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014 Fellow)
  • Social Science and Humanities Research Council Impact Connection Award Finalist (2014 and 2015)
  • Killam Faculty Research Fellowship (2011)
  • Killam Faculty Research Prize (2010)
  • Robert E. Knox Master Teaching Award (2010)
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award (2010)
  • Mind Gym Academic Prize Honouree (2007)
  • Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies – Early Career Scholar (2007)
  • Chronicle of Higher Education Rising Star (2004)

Dr. Dunn is currently accepting graduate students.

Elizabeth Dunn

Professor
phone 604 827 3144
location_on Kenny Room 2013--2136 West Mall

PhD, University of Virginia, 2004

Dr. Elizabeth Dunn is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia. Dunn conducts experimental research examining how time, money, and technology shape human happiness. She is the co-author of Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending (Simon & Schuster) with Dr. Michael Norton and she has given talks at PopTech! and TEDx.

Dr. Dunn conducts experimental research on happiness, with a current focus on how mobile technology can both support and undermine human well-being. Her work has appeared in top journals, with three papers published in Science.

Dwyer, R., Kushlev, K. & Dunn, E. W. (2018). Smartphone use undermines the enjoyment of face-to-face interactions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 78: 233-239. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2017.10.007.

Dunn, E. W. & Dwyer, R. (2018). Technology and the Future of Happiness. In Forgas, J. P. & Baumeister, R. F. (Eds.), The Social Psychology of Living Well. New York: Psychology Press.

Whillans, A. V., Dunn, E. W. & Norton, M. I. (2018). Overcoming barriers to time-saving: Reminders of future busyness encourage consumers to buy time. Social Influence, 13,117-124.

Dwyer, R., Dunn, E. W. & Hershfield, H. (2017). Cousins or conjoined twins: How different are meaning and happiness in everyday life?. Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, doi: 10.1080/23743603.2017.1376580.

Kushlev, K., Proulx, J. D. E. & Dunn, E. W. (2017). Digitally connected, socially disconnected: The effects of relying on technology rather than other people. Computers in Human Behaviour, 76: 68-74.

Whillans, A. V., Dunn, E. W., Smeets, P., Bekkers, R. & Norton, M. I. (2017). Buying time promotes happiness. PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1706541114.

Dunn, E. W., & Norton, M. (2013). Happy Money: The science of smarter spending. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Nelson, S. K., Kushlev, K., English, T., Carstensen, L. L., Dunn, E. W. & Lyubomirsky, S. (2013). In defence of parenthood: Children are associated with more joy that misery. Psychological Science, 24(1): 3-10.

Quoidbach, J., Dunn, E. W., Petrides, K. V., & Mikolajczak, M. (2010). Money giveth, money taketh away: The dual effect of wealth on happiness. Psychological Science, 21: 759-763.

Kawakami, K., Dunn, E. W., Karmali, F. & Dovidio, J. F. (2009). Mispredicting affective and behavioural responses to racism. Science, 323: 276-278.

Dunn, E. W., Aknin, L. B., & Norton, M. I. (2008). Spending money on others promotes happiness. Science, 319: 1687-1688.

For a list of full publication, visit Google Scholar or her lab website.

  • Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists (2015)
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014 Fellow)
  • Social Science and Humanities Research Council Impact Connection Award Finalist (2014 and 2015)
  • Killam Faculty Research Fellowship (2011)
  • Killam Faculty Research Prize (2010)
  • Robert E. Knox Master Teaching Award (2010)
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award (2010)
  • Mind Gym Academic Prize Honouree (2007)
  • Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies – Early Career Scholar (2007)
  • Chronicle of Higher Education Rising Star (2004)

Dr. Dunn is currently accepting graduate students.