David King

Sessional Instructor (Continuing Status)
location_on Kenny Room 2527--2136 West Mall

Research Areas

Education

Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 2013
M.Sc., Trent University, 2008

About

David is an instructor in the Department of Psychology at UBC, leading courses in personality, health psychology, and the psychology of death and dying since 2012. His current research addresses the question of how stress unfolds within social contexts of varying size and complexity, from dyads and families to broader social and cultural circumstances (e.g., disease outbreaks, collective traumas). Other academic interests include socioeconomic factors in health, the impact of stigma and discrimination on well-being, and the role of meaning in trauma. In addition to multiple publications in peer-reviewed journals, he is also the co-author of two undergraduate textbooks. Whether in writing, teaching, or research, David is committed to furthering critical thought and discourse on the complexities of human nature.


Research

Research interests include health psychology, stress and coping, personality, and interpersonal dynamics.


Publications

King, D. B., O’Rourke, N., Canham, S. L., & Cobb, R. (2018). Reciprocal effects of life satisfaction and depressive symptoms within long-wed couples over time. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 73(3), 363-371.

King, D. B., Cappeliez, P., Canham, S. L., & O’Rourke, N. (2017). Functions of reminiscence in later life: Predicting change in the physical and mental health of older adults over time. Aging & Mental Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2017.1396581

Pow, J., King, D. B., Stephenson, E., & DeLongis, A. (2017). Does social support buffer the effects of occupational stress on sleep quality among paramedics? A daily diary study. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 22(1), 71-85.

Hilpert, P., Randall, A. K., Sorokowski, P., Atkins, D. C., Sorokowska, A., Ahmadi, K., Algraibeh, A. M.,…King, D. B., et al. (2016). The associations of dyadic coping and relationship satisfaction vary between and within nations: A 35-nation study. Frontiers of Psychology, 7, 1106.

King, D. B., Kamble, S., & DeLongis, A. (2016). Coping with influenza A/H1N1 in India: Empathy is associated with increased vaccination and health precautions. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 54(6), 283-294.

King, D. B., Cappeliez, P., N., Carmel, S., Bachner, Y. G., & O’Rourke, N. (2015). Remembering genocide: The effects of early life trauma on reminiscence functions among Israeli Holocaust survivors. Traumatology, 21(3), 145-152.

King, D. B., & DeLongis, A. (2014). When couples disconnect: Rumination and withdrawal as maladaptive responses to everyday stress. Journal of Family Psychology, 28(4), 460-469.

King, D. B., Mara, C, & DeCicco, T. L. (2012). Connecting the spiritual and emotional intelligences: Confirming an intelligence criterion and assessing the role of empathy. The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 31, 11-20.

King, D. B., & DeCicco, T. L. (2009). A viable model and self-report measure of spiritual intelligence. The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 28, 68-85.


Awards

  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Award (2014-2016)
  • Early Career Achievement Award, American Psychological Association (2014)
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship Award (2008-2012)

David King

Sessional Instructor (Continuing Status)
location_on Kenny Room 2527--2136 West Mall

Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 2013
M.Sc., Trent University, 2008

David is an instructor in the Department of Psychology at UBC, leading courses in personality, health psychology, and the psychology of death and dying since 2012. His current research addresses the question of how stress unfolds within social contexts of varying size and complexity, from dyads and families to broader social and cultural circumstances (e.g., disease outbreaks, collective traumas). Other academic interests include socioeconomic factors in health, the impact of stigma and discrimination on well-being, and the role of meaning in trauma. In addition to multiple publications in peer-reviewed journals, he is also the co-author of two undergraduate textbooks. Whether in writing, teaching, or research, David is committed to furthering critical thought and discourse on the complexities of human nature.

Research interests include health psychology, stress and coping, personality, and interpersonal dynamics.

King, D. B., O’Rourke, N., Canham, S. L., & Cobb, R. (2018). Reciprocal effects of life satisfaction and depressive symptoms within long-wed couples over time. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 73(3), 363-371.

King, D. B., Cappeliez, P., Canham, S. L., & O’Rourke, N. (2017). Functions of reminiscence in later life: Predicting change in the physical and mental health of older adults over time. Aging & Mental Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2017.1396581

Pow, J., King, D. B., Stephenson, E., & DeLongis, A. (2017). Does social support buffer the effects of occupational stress on sleep quality among paramedics? A daily diary study. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 22(1), 71-85.

Hilpert, P., Randall, A. K., Sorokowski, P., Atkins, D. C., Sorokowska, A., Ahmadi, K., Algraibeh, A. M.,…King, D. B., et al. (2016). The associations of dyadic coping and relationship satisfaction vary between and within nations: A 35-nation study. Frontiers of Psychology, 7, 1106.

King, D. B., Kamble, S., & DeLongis, A. (2016). Coping with influenza A/H1N1 in India: Empathy is associated with increased vaccination and health precautions. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 54(6), 283-294.

King, D. B., Cappeliez, P., N., Carmel, S., Bachner, Y. G., & O’Rourke, N. (2015). Remembering genocide: The effects of early life trauma on reminiscence functions among Israeli Holocaust survivors. Traumatology, 21(3), 145-152.

King, D. B., & DeLongis, A. (2014). When couples disconnect: Rumination and withdrawal as maladaptive responses to everyday stress. Journal of Family Psychology, 28(4), 460-469.

King, D. B., Mara, C, & DeCicco, T. L. (2012). Connecting the spiritual and emotional intelligences: Confirming an intelligence criterion and assessing the role of empathy. The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 31, 11-20.

King, D. B., & DeCicco, T. L. (2009). A viable model and self-report measure of spiritual intelligence. The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 28, 68-85.

  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Award (2014-2016)
  • Early Career Achievement Award, American Psychological Association (2014)
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship Award (2008-2012)

David King

Sessional Instructor (Continuing Status)
location_on Kenny Room 2527--2136 West Mall

Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 2013
M.Sc., Trent University, 2008

David is an instructor in the Department of Psychology at UBC, leading courses in personality, health psychology, and the psychology of death and dying since 2012. His current research addresses the question of how stress unfolds within social contexts of varying size and complexity, from dyads and families to broader social and cultural circumstances (e.g., disease outbreaks, collective traumas). Other academic interests include socioeconomic factors in health, the impact of stigma and discrimination on well-being, and the role of meaning in trauma. In addition to multiple publications in peer-reviewed journals, he is also the co-author of two undergraduate textbooks. Whether in writing, teaching, or research, David is committed to furthering critical thought and discourse on the complexities of human nature.

Research interests include health psychology, stress and coping, personality, and interpersonal dynamics.

King, D. B., O’Rourke, N., Canham, S. L., & Cobb, R. (2018). Reciprocal effects of life satisfaction and depressive symptoms within long-wed couples over time. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 73(3), 363-371.

King, D. B., Cappeliez, P., Canham, S. L., & O’Rourke, N. (2017). Functions of reminiscence in later life: Predicting change in the physical and mental health of older adults over time. Aging & Mental Health. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2017.1396581

Pow, J., King, D. B., Stephenson, E., & DeLongis, A. (2017). Does social support buffer the effects of occupational stress on sleep quality among paramedics? A daily diary study. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 22(1), 71-85.

Hilpert, P., Randall, A. K., Sorokowski, P., Atkins, D. C., Sorokowska, A., Ahmadi, K., Algraibeh, A. M.,…King, D. B., et al. (2016). The associations of dyadic coping and relationship satisfaction vary between and within nations: A 35-nation study. Frontiers of Psychology, 7, 1106.

King, D. B., Kamble, S., & DeLongis, A. (2016). Coping with influenza A/H1N1 in India: Empathy is associated with increased vaccination and health precautions. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 54(6), 283-294.

King, D. B., Cappeliez, P., N., Carmel, S., Bachner, Y. G., & O’Rourke, N. (2015). Remembering genocide: The effects of early life trauma on reminiscence functions among Israeli Holocaust survivors. Traumatology, 21(3), 145-152.

King, D. B., & DeLongis, A. (2014). When couples disconnect: Rumination and withdrawal as maladaptive responses to everyday stress. Journal of Family Psychology, 28(4), 460-469.

King, D. B., Mara, C, & DeCicco, T. L. (2012). Connecting the spiritual and emotional intelligences: Confirming an intelligence criterion and assessing the role of empathy. The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 31, 11-20.

King, D. B., & DeCicco, T. L. (2009). A viable model and self-report measure of spiritual intelligence. The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 28, 68-85.

  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Award (2014-2016)
  • Early Career Achievement Award, American Psychological Association (2014)
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship Award (2008-2012)