Tara Dennehy

Postdoctoral Fellow
location_on Kenny Room 3535--2136 West Mall

Research Areas

Education

PhD in Social Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2018

About

Dr. Tara C. Dennehy is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Toni Schmader and the Engendering Success in STEM consortium, a research partnership with the shared goal to foster women’s inclusion and success in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). 

As part of the ESS Consortium, Tara is working on Projects PRISM and RISE. In her work related to Project RISE, Tara is particularly interested in studying the potential role of male allies in changing cultural norms for women in STEM.


Research

Tara’s research is centered on understanding the power of stereotype-laden social contexts. A major line of research examines how stereotypes activated in social situations (by the actions of interaction partners or by peripheral cues) affect dynamic social interactions in high stakes settings, such as job interviews. In a second line of research, Tara focuses on interventions that powerfully boost individuals’ resilience against negative stereotypes over time. In a third line of research, Tara explores how violations of gender and race stereotypic expectancies influence perceptions of others without perceivers’ awareness.


Publications

Dennehy, T. C. & Dasgupta, N. (2017). Female peer mentors early in college increase women’s positive academic experiences and retention in engineering. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114, 5964–5969. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1613117114

Dennehy, T. C., Moore, C., Smith, J., & Dasgupta, N. (2017). Stereotype threat and stereotype inoculation for underrepresented students in the first year of college. In R. S. Feldman (Ed.) The First Year of College: Research, Theory, and Practice on Improving the Student Experience and Increasing Retention (pp. 309-344). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK. doi: 9781316811764

†Conway, L. G., Boyd, R. L., Dennehy, T. C., Mills, D. J., Repke, M. A. (2017). Political behavior inside and outside the lab: Bringing political research to the real world. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 3, 227-230. doi: 0.1037/tps0000129.

Berger, C. C., Dennehy, T. C., Bargh, J. A., & Morsella, E. (2016). Nisbett & Wilson (1977) revisited: The little that we can know and can tell. Social Cognition, 34, 167-195. doi: 0.1521/soco.2016.34.3.167

Ben-Zeev, A., & Dennehy, T. C. (2014). When boys wear pink:  A gendered color cue violation evokes risk taking. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 15, 486-489. doi: 10.1037/a0034683

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., *Goodrich, R. I., Kolarik, B. S. & Geisler, M. W. (2014). When an “educated” black male becomes lighter in the mind’s eye: Evidence for a skin tone memory bias. SAGE Open, 4, 1-9. doi: 10.1177/2158244013516770

Dennehy, T. C., Ben-Zeev, A., & Tanigawa, N. (2014). “Be prepared”: A mindset for alleviating social identity threat. British Journal of Social Psychology, 53, 585-594. doi: 10.1111/bjso.12071

Dennehy, T. C., Cooper, S. T., Molapour, T., & Morsella, E. (2014). Is there release from masking from isomorphism between perception and action? Brain Sciences, 4, 230-239. doi: 10.3390/brainsci4020220

Dennehy, T. C. (2014). Inherence is an aspect of psychological essentialism. Commentary on Cimpian & Salomon. Brain & Behavior Sciences, 37, 486-487. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X13003695

Morsella, E., Dennehy, T. C., & Bargh, J. A. (2013). Voluntary action and the three forms of binding in the brain. In A. Clark, J. Kiverstein, & T. Vierkant (Eds.), Decomposing the will (pp. 183-198). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ben-Zeev, A., *Chan, L., *Scharnetzki, L., & Dennehy, T. C. (2012). Hyper-masculinity in the media:  When men “walk into the fog” to avoid affective communication. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 1, 53-61. doi: 10.1037/a0027099

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., & Kaufman, J. C. (2012). Blurring boundaries: Bisexual versus lesbian and heterosexual women’s self-assessed creativity. Journal of Bisexuality, 12, 1-13. doi: 10.1080/15299716.2012.702614

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., Sackman, R., Olides, A., & Berger, C. C. (2011). Flirting with threat:  Social identity and the perils of the female communality prescription. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 1308-1311. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.05.016

Carillo, J., Corning, A., Dennehy, T. C., & Crosby, F. J. (2011). Relative deprivation theory:  Understanding the dynamics of discontent. In D. Chadee (Ed.), Selected Theories in Social Psychology (pp. 140-160). Oxford, UK:  Blackwell Publishing.

† = Authorship order for authors 2-5 determined by last-name alphabetical order
* = Denotes undergraduate or post-baccalaureate student co-author/advisee at the time of submission or presentation.


Awards

  • Early Career Travel Award ($1000) from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2018)
  • Geis Memorial Award ($15,000) to support dissertation research on the Psychology of Women, APA Division 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women) (2014)
  • EASP Summer School Scholarship ($750) from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014)
  • Dissertation Grant ($500) from the University of Massachusetts Psychology Department (2014)
  • Graduate Research Grant ($1,500) from Psi Chi (2014)
  • Clara Mayo Grant ($1,000) from Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2010)

Tara Dennehy

Postdoctoral Fellow
location_on Kenny Room 3535--2136 West Mall

PhD in Social Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2018

Dr. Tara C. Dennehy is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Toni Schmader and the Engendering Success in STEM consortium, a research partnership with the shared goal to foster women’s inclusion and success in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). 

As part of the ESS Consortium, Tara is working on Projects PRISM and RISE. In her work related to Project RISE, Tara is particularly interested in studying the potential role of male allies in changing cultural norms for women in STEM.

Tara’s research is centered on understanding the power of stereotype-laden social contexts. A major line of research examines how stereotypes activated in social situations (by the actions of interaction partners or by peripheral cues) affect dynamic social interactions in high stakes settings, such as job interviews. In a second line of research, Tara focuses on interventions that powerfully boost individuals’ resilience against negative stereotypes over time. In a third line of research, Tara explores how violations of gender and race stereotypic expectancies influence perceptions of others without perceivers’ awareness.

Dennehy, T. C. & Dasgupta, N. (2017). Female peer mentors early in college increase women’s positive academic experiences and retention in engineering. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114, 5964–5969. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1613117114

Dennehy, T. C., Moore, C., Smith, J., & Dasgupta, N. (2017). Stereotype threat and stereotype inoculation for underrepresented students in the first year of college. In R. S. Feldman (Ed.) The First Year of College: Research, Theory, and Practice on Improving the Student Experience and Increasing Retention (pp. 309-344). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK. doi: 9781316811764

†Conway, L. G., Boyd, R. L., Dennehy, T. C., Mills, D. J., Repke, M. A. (2017). Political behavior inside and outside the lab: Bringing political research to the real world. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 3, 227-230. doi: 0.1037/tps0000129.

Berger, C. C., Dennehy, T. C., Bargh, J. A., & Morsella, E. (2016). Nisbett & Wilson (1977) revisited: The little that we can know and can tell. Social Cognition, 34, 167-195. doi: 0.1521/soco.2016.34.3.167

Ben-Zeev, A., & Dennehy, T. C. (2014). When boys wear pink:  A gendered color cue violation evokes risk taking. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 15, 486-489. doi: 10.1037/a0034683

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., *Goodrich, R. I., Kolarik, B. S. & Geisler, M. W. (2014). When an “educated” black male becomes lighter in the mind’s eye: Evidence for a skin tone memory bias. SAGE Open, 4, 1-9. doi: 10.1177/2158244013516770

Dennehy, T. C., Ben-Zeev, A., & Tanigawa, N. (2014). “Be prepared”: A mindset for alleviating social identity threat. British Journal of Social Psychology, 53, 585-594. doi: 10.1111/bjso.12071

Dennehy, T. C., Cooper, S. T., Molapour, T., & Morsella, E. (2014). Is there release from masking from isomorphism between perception and action? Brain Sciences, 4, 230-239. doi: 10.3390/brainsci4020220

Dennehy, T. C. (2014). Inherence is an aspect of psychological essentialism. Commentary on Cimpian & Salomon. Brain & Behavior Sciences, 37, 486-487. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X13003695

Morsella, E., Dennehy, T. C., & Bargh, J. A. (2013). Voluntary action and the three forms of binding in the brain. In A. Clark, J. Kiverstein, & T. Vierkant (Eds.), Decomposing the will (pp. 183-198). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ben-Zeev, A., *Chan, L., *Scharnetzki, L., & Dennehy, T. C. (2012). Hyper-masculinity in the media:  When men “walk into the fog” to avoid affective communication. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 1, 53-61. doi: 10.1037/a0027099

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., & Kaufman, J. C. (2012). Blurring boundaries: Bisexual versus lesbian and heterosexual women’s self-assessed creativity. Journal of Bisexuality, 12, 1-13. doi: 10.1080/15299716.2012.702614

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., Sackman, R., Olides, A., & Berger, C. C. (2011). Flirting with threat:  Social identity and the perils of the female communality prescription. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 1308-1311. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.05.016

Carillo, J., Corning, A., Dennehy, T. C., & Crosby, F. J. (2011). Relative deprivation theory:  Understanding the dynamics of discontent. In D. Chadee (Ed.), Selected Theories in Social Psychology (pp. 140-160). Oxford, UK:  Blackwell Publishing.

† = Authorship order for authors 2-5 determined by last-name alphabetical order
* = Denotes undergraduate or post-baccalaureate student co-author/advisee at the time of submission or presentation.

  • Early Career Travel Award ($1000) from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2018)
  • Geis Memorial Award ($15,000) to support dissertation research on the Psychology of Women, APA Division 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women) (2014)
  • EASP Summer School Scholarship ($750) from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014)
  • Dissertation Grant ($500) from the University of Massachusetts Psychology Department (2014)
  • Graduate Research Grant ($1,500) from Psi Chi (2014)
  • Clara Mayo Grant ($1,000) from Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2010)

Tara Dennehy

Postdoctoral Fellow
location_on Kenny Room 3535--2136 West Mall

PhD in Social Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2018

Dr. Tara C. Dennehy is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Toni Schmader and the Engendering Success in STEM consortium, a research partnership with the shared goal to foster women’s inclusion and success in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). 

As part of the ESS Consortium, Tara is working on Projects PRISM and RISE. In her work related to Project RISE, Tara is particularly interested in studying the potential role of male allies in changing cultural norms for women in STEM.

Tara’s research is centered on understanding the power of stereotype-laden social contexts. A major line of research examines how stereotypes activated in social situations (by the actions of interaction partners or by peripheral cues) affect dynamic social interactions in high stakes settings, such as job interviews. In a second line of research, Tara focuses on interventions that powerfully boost individuals’ resilience against negative stereotypes over time. In a third line of research, Tara explores how violations of gender and race stereotypic expectancies influence perceptions of others without perceivers’ awareness.

Dennehy, T. C. & Dasgupta, N. (2017). Female peer mentors early in college increase women’s positive academic experiences and retention in engineering. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114, 5964–5969. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1613117114

Dennehy, T. C., Moore, C., Smith, J., & Dasgupta, N. (2017). Stereotype threat and stereotype inoculation for underrepresented students in the first year of college. In R. S. Feldman (Ed.) The First Year of College: Research, Theory, and Practice on Improving the Student Experience and Increasing Retention (pp. 309-344). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK. doi: 9781316811764

†Conway, L. G., Boyd, R. L., Dennehy, T. C., Mills, D. J., Repke, M. A. (2017). Political behavior inside and outside the lab: Bringing political research to the real world. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 3, 227-230. doi: 0.1037/tps0000129.

Berger, C. C., Dennehy, T. C., Bargh, J. A., & Morsella, E. (2016). Nisbett & Wilson (1977) revisited: The little that we can know and can tell. Social Cognition, 34, 167-195. doi: 0.1521/soco.2016.34.3.167

Ben-Zeev, A., & Dennehy, T. C. (2014). When boys wear pink:  A gendered color cue violation evokes risk taking. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 15, 486-489. doi: 10.1037/a0034683

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., *Goodrich, R. I., Kolarik, B. S. & Geisler, M. W. (2014). When an “educated” black male becomes lighter in the mind’s eye: Evidence for a skin tone memory bias. SAGE Open, 4, 1-9. doi: 10.1177/2158244013516770

Dennehy, T. C., Ben-Zeev, A., & Tanigawa, N. (2014). “Be prepared”: A mindset for alleviating social identity threat. British Journal of Social Psychology, 53, 585-594. doi: 10.1111/bjso.12071

Dennehy, T. C., Cooper, S. T., Molapour, T., & Morsella, E. (2014). Is there release from masking from isomorphism between perception and action? Brain Sciences, 4, 230-239. doi: 10.3390/brainsci4020220

Dennehy, T. C. (2014). Inherence is an aspect of psychological essentialism. Commentary on Cimpian & Salomon. Brain & Behavior Sciences, 37, 486-487. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X13003695

Morsella, E., Dennehy, T. C., & Bargh, J. A. (2013). Voluntary action and the three forms of binding in the brain. In A. Clark, J. Kiverstein, & T. Vierkant (Eds.), Decomposing the will (pp. 183-198). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ben-Zeev, A., *Chan, L., *Scharnetzki, L., & Dennehy, T. C. (2012). Hyper-masculinity in the media:  When men “walk into the fog” to avoid affective communication. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 1, 53-61. doi: 10.1037/a0027099

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., & Kaufman, J. C. (2012). Blurring boundaries: Bisexual versus lesbian and heterosexual women’s self-assessed creativity. Journal of Bisexuality, 12, 1-13. doi: 10.1080/15299716.2012.702614

Ben-Zeev, A., Dennehy, T. C., Sackman, R., Olides, A., & Berger, C. C. (2011). Flirting with threat:  Social identity and the perils of the female communality prescription. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 1308-1311. doi: 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.05.016

Carillo, J., Corning, A., Dennehy, T. C., & Crosby, F. J. (2011). Relative deprivation theory:  Understanding the dynamics of discontent. In D. Chadee (Ed.), Selected Theories in Social Psychology (pp. 140-160). Oxford, UK:  Blackwell Publishing.

† = Authorship order for authors 2-5 determined by last-name alphabetical order
* = Denotes undergraduate or post-baccalaureate student co-author/advisee at the time of submission or presentation.

  • Early Career Travel Award ($1000) from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2018)
  • Geis Memorial Award ($15,000) to support dissertation research on the Psychology of Women, APA Division 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women) (2014)
  • EASP Summer School Scholarship ($750) from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014)
  • Dissertation Grant ($500) from the University of Massachusetts Psychology Department (2014)
  • Graduate Research Grant ($1,500) from Psi Chi (2014)
  • Clara Mayo Grant ($1,000) from Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2010)