Research interests:

Self and social identity, stereotyping and prejudice, coping with social stigma, emotion and motivation, social cognition.

Schmader, T., Croft, A., Whitehead, J., & Stone, J. (2013). A peek inside the targets’ toolbox: How stigmatized targets deflect discrimination by invoking a common identity. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 35, 141-149.

Inzlicht, M., & Schmader, T. (Eds.) (2012). Stereotype threat: Theory, Process, and Application. Oxford University Press.

Croft, A., & Schmader, T. (2012). The feedback withholding bias: Minority students do not receive critical feedback from evaluators concerned about appearing racist. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 1139-1144.

Holleran, S., Whitehead, J., Schmader, T., & Mehl, M. (2011). Talking shop and shooting the breeze: Predicting women’s job disengagement from workplace conversations. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 2, 65-71.

Forbes, C.E., & Schmader, T. (2010). Retraining implicit attitudes and stereotypes to distinguish motivation from performance in a stereotype threatening domain. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 99, 740-754.

Schmader, T., Forbes, C.E., Zhang, S., & Johns, M.J. (2009). A meta-cognitive perspective on cognitive deficits experienced in intellectually threatening environments. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Schmader, T., Johns, M., & Forbes, C. (2008). An integrated process model of stereotype threat effects on performance. Psychological Review, 115, 336-356.

Lickel, B., Schmader, T., Curtis, M., Scarnier, M., & Ames, D.R. (2005). Vicarious shame and guilt. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 8, 145-157.

Schmader, T., & Johns, M. (2003). Convergent evidence that stereotype threat reduces working memory capacity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 440-452.

Winter 2017

PSYC102 Introduction to Developmental, Social, Personality, and Clinical Psychology Sections

Introduction to methods and statistics, motivation, assessment, developmental, personality, clinical, and social psychology. Credit will be granted for only one of PSYC 100 and PSYC 102.

Groups: